Around Town
Malvern School Hosts Seventh Annual Lemonade Day
The Community YMCA Launches Annual Strong Kids Campaign
Renaissance Pilates Now Open
Ask The Experts
Ask The Expert - Harbor Lights Financial Group, Inc.
Ask The Expert - Rudolf C. Thompson, M.D., F.A.C.S.
Ask The Experts - Rudolf C. Thompson, M.D., F.A.C.S.
Bay Wellness
Bay Wellness - Genital Warts
Bay Wellness - Making Weight Loss a Family Affair
Bay Wellness - Don't Forget
Best Bets
The Guide 2014 - Downtown Tile
The Guide 2014 - The Pine Tavern
The Guide 2014 - Angelina’s Ristorante
Black Book
Cover Story
The Ultimate Fighter: Renzo Gracie
Barry Habib - Creative Entrepreneur
Paul Pilcz - Marlboro's Gleek
Daytripper
Day Tripper - FRENCHTOWN
DayTripper: Laurita Vineyards & Winery
Day Tripper - SLEEPY HOLLOW, NEW YORK
Eats
Eats: Twin Lights Bakery Cafe
Eat Beat - FISH Urban Dining
Eats: Addison Park
Etc
Etc - School Daze
Etc - The Endless Summer
Etc - Walking through Monmouth County
Fall Guide
Fall Guide - Kids Activity
Fall Guide - Performing Theatre
Fall Guide - Kids Fashions
Featured Artist
Featured Artist - Taylor Franzreb
Featured Artist - Carol Bruno
Featured Artist - Dorothy Kaplan
Gift Guide
The Guide 2014 - Above
Gift Guide - Toy Box
The Guide 2014 - Brown’s Heating, Cooling and Plumbing
Health Talk
Health Talk - Frank Borao, M.D.
Our Pick - Dr. Young Orthodontic & Cosmetic Services
Health Talk - IVF New Jersey
Health, Wellness & Beauty
Health - Marlboro Village Pharmacy
Health - DeForte Dentistry
Health - Physicians for Alternative Medicine, P.C.
Homes
The View: The Bereznyaks
Luxurious, Lavish, and Livable
Romancing the Tudor - The Haverlins Brighten Tradition with a Personal Touch
Letter
Spring has Sprung!
Letter to Colts Neck: Falling Into Good Times
Warm Winter Wishes
Living in Colts Neck
Feels Like Home
Home at Last
Impeccable Style
Newsletter Articles
The Home - Visual Impact Decorating Gallery
The Home - Cabitron
The Home Guide - Visit Brock Farms
Our Picks
Our Pick - Atlantic Medical Imaging
Company Profile - JGS Insurance
Our Pick: Nevada Exchange Trading Post Outlet
People On The Move
People on the Move: Brian Nelson
People On The Move - Linette Reeman
Kids On The Move - Michael and Ally Baratta,and Sally Carden
Summer Guide
Out & About - Summer 2013
Dish - Summer Guide 2014
Summer Guide 2014 - Out & About
The Bay
The Bay - A Body In Motion
The Bay - $1 Million Emergency Department Expansion Opens
The Bay - Healthier Heart
The Guide
The Guide 2014 - Crown Elegance Bridal
The Guide 2014 - Marlboro Village Pharmacy
The Guide 2014 - Manfredi Auto Group
The Home Guide
The Home Guide - Dulce Feito-Daly, LLC
The Home Guide - New Jersey Best Lawns
The Home Guide - Brock Farms
Weigh In
Weigh In - What's Your Favorite Pizza Place in Monmouth County?
Weigh In - If you could invite anyone living or dead to...
Weigh In -What’s your favorite night-spot in Monmouth County?

Etc - School Daze
08/30/2011 - By Eric Tucker

Etc - School Daze




Eric Tucker goes back to school


Considering that lost time is not found again, I’ve been thinking...

Should we make our children go to school in the summer? It may ease the dread of going back to school (I’m thinking of  the teachers here) by removing the summer break entirely. I’m just saying.

No doubt, most folks would answer with an authoritative "No! Thank you for asking." Fans of Schoolhouse Rock will  recognize the beginning of that authoritative response as an "interjection." I chose to set it apart from the sentence by an  exclamation point.You could use a comma when the feeling is not as strong. The younger generation might use an  emoticon frowny face :(, as a form of interjection.

Ah, my misspent youth, filled with lost time and wasted in front of the television watching the same stuff repeatedly. I  picked up some things by repetition, as exemplified by the Schoolhouse Rock reference above. Now, as one notices the pool water gradually cooling, it's time to pull our kids away from the televisions, video games, beaches, and street  corners. Summer vacation is ending. :(

One of the best weeks to stay at the beach is the first week in September. This is a moot point for anyone whose  youngest child (a.k.a. "the accident" or "the favorite" depending on the audience) is entering kindergarten, and whose  first child has yet to finish school. This select group of families gets to go to Target with a different list of school  supplies for each kid. Certainly there's a good reason the classroom needs so many tissues up front. I'll assume it's  because the boys won't have long sleeves available until the weather cools.

Classrooms trigger my day dreaming tendencies. Sure, many times it's hard to differentiate pieces of information I was not listening to from those I forgot, those I misunderstood, and those that others forgot to tell me. I’m now back in the classroom on what is commonly known as Parents Night (a.k.a. "Back to School” - or "Date Night" for couples who  don’t otherwise get out.)

I carry a positive attitude into the school, eager to learn what goes on during our child's day. Our kids, the boys in  particular, tell us nothing. The nightly discourse goes something like this:

Q. "What did you do at school today?"
A. “Nothing.”
Q. “Nothing?”
A. "Learned stuff."
Q "Like what?"
A "I don't know."
Q Who sits at your table?
A "I forget."
Q. “What did you do at recess?”


They think evasive answers deter me. But tomorrow is a new day with more fruitless questioning.

At parent's night, lamentably, shortly after the opening "Thank you for coming tonight..." I tune out quite by accident.  It's like when a waitress lists the night’s specials. I hear the first one and try to picture it. Meanwhile, she's on auto-pilot rattling off the dishes she's memorized. I can't conceptualize the first dish and listen to the following ones at the  same time. That's multitasking, which is physiologically impossible. Once I go back to listening I'm lost and then just  nod my head till she leaves and ask someone at the table what was said. When I'm driving with the family, I tune out  everything. If I notice voices trying to get my attention, I ask my wife to repeat what was said. The kids do that, too.  We always ask Mommy to repeat what someone else said when we didn't hear/weren't listening. (Try this in your home!)

Back at Parent’s Night, it's not long after I start pondering the teacher’s first bullet item that the classroom triggers a  Pavlovian response cultivated over 17 years of schooling and my mind wanders here, there, and everywhere. Once I  realize that I'm lost, there’s no getting back in the groove. I can't even ask a question for fear of looking like an idiot.  What's the point? I'll only forget what was said - and I can always ask Mommy what I missed.

One thing I picked up at these affairs is you can expect to find one of two types of teachers on Parent's Night. First,  there is the highly motivated teacher who is eager to employ the latest teaching theories. The second type is the one  who has taught before. No doubt, both types deserve our love and support to the extent that they don't grow  complacent.

The teachers deserving of the most praise, however, are those who assign the least amount of homework. Do their  pupils learn any less? Someone should apply for a grant to study that. Summer is a nice break from the blessing of overseeing homework.

When our little angel was in first grade, one of her weekly assignments was to cut letters out of magazines and paste  them together, like a ransom note, displaying the week’s spelling words. She did not persist at this pointless preschool task. It fell to me to do most of the cutting. I still can’t spell well, proving the exercise was pointless. Mercifully, her  younger brothers were spared that task.

In summary, it’s time for back-to-school. Compared to the Monmouth County Youth Detention Center, a possible  alternative, it’s not that bad.








Powered by eDirectory™